Develop Your Own Film Part One-Equipment And Chemicals-Episode 11

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Have you wanted to develop your own film but were scared away by the thought that it was too difficult. Well, I’m here to say that developing your own film, especially black & white film, is easy and fun!

I started using/developing film in the Fall of 2012 and really enjoy the process. I was a little intimidated with the process but after spending some time researching the process and a little practice I have been getting consistently good results. Believe me, if I can do it you can do it, it’s not nearly as hard as it seems. This is part one of a three part series in helping you go from having never developed a roll of film “noob” to semi-experienced “home darkroom pro” who can share your film images with the world. Here’s a breakdown of the parts:

1.This first part will cover the equipment (camera, film,developing tanks, etc.) and chemicals you’ll need to get ready to develop your own film.

2. Part two will be a detailed walk-through of the film developing process with tips and suggestions that I’ve learned along the way.

3. Part three will be a quick review of how to scan your developed negatives into your computer so you can share them with the world.

OK, on to the fun!

Day 319-A Developing Interest

Day 319-A Developing Interest

Get A Film Camera

Before you can develop your own film you first need a film camera. See Episode 3 for tips on purchasing your 1st film camera. I would recommend getting a 35mm slr. There are a lot of film cameras available so finding one isn’t hard but you will want to do your research before purchasing.

Once you have your film camera…

Get Some Black & White Film

There is still a decent selection of black and white film, both in 35mm and 120 size. In the 18 months I’ve been shooting film I’ve come across a few that have become favorites of mine. Film is a very personal thing and every film has different qualities so what I like may not be what you end up liking. Here are some worthwhile films to consider when starting out. They are all good film and seem to develop well with a variety of developers:

100 Speed

1. Fuji Neopan Acros 100-($6.25/36 exposure roll) at Adorama

2.Kodak T-Max-($4.79/24 exposures, $4.95/36 exposures) at Amazon

3. Ilford FP4-($4.39/36 exposures) at Adorama

3. Ilford Delta 100-($4.50/24 exposures, $6.25/36 exposures) at Adorama

4. Kentmere 100-($2.95/24 exposures) at Adorama- a decent cheap film that I often use in my little Olympus point-n-shoot film camera. Get a roll or two of this to practice with before trying to develop a “real” roll of film with once-in-a-lifetime shots on it.

400 Speed

1.Ilford HP-5 Plus 400-($4.25/24 exposures, $6.25/36 exposures) at Amazon

2. Ilford Delta 400-($4.50/24 exposures, $6.29/36 exposures) at Adorama

3.Kodak T-Max 400-($5 for both 24 & 36 exposures) at Adorama

Time To Develop The Film-Equipment You Need

Once you have your camera and have shot a roll or two of B&W film you need to have some basic equipment/supplies in order to develop the film. I have listed the equipment I use, in the order I use it, in order to develop the film. I use a combination of Amazon and Adorama for nearly all of my photography supplies/equipment so the links listed below are from each site, depending on which one had the better price/shipping terms, etc. as best as I could. There are plenty of other photography supply options, just do a search and you’ll come up with a lot of options.

Film Changing Bag (27×30)-($23.95) from Amazon-You will need a very dark place to transfer the film from the roll that you took out of the camera to the developing tank. A tabletop changing bag is a great way to accomplish this task.

Film Canister Opener-($14.95) from Adorama-If you’re developing 35mm you’ll need something to open the canister so you can load it on the reel. I hear this works great but I make do with a traditional bottle opener which is also very important for opening a bottle of tasty Craft Beer to enjoy while developing your film! :-)

Scissors-(FREE-hopefully you have some of these around the house!)-You’ll need something to trim the film (and cut the end off of the 35mm roll) before loading it on the spool. I use a pair of regular kitchen scissors that have a blunt tip (better safe than sorry while working blind in a changing bag).

Paterson Universal tank and 2 reels-#115-($30.59) from Amazon-This is where you will put the film and chemicals. It has a plastic reel that you load the film on (inside the dark changing bag) and once the film is on the reel you put it in the tank and screw the top on. You can then do the rest of the development process in daylight because the tank is lightproof but allows chemical/water to be added.

Plastic Beaker Set – 5 Sizes – 50, 100, 250, 500 and 1000ml-($6.99) from Amazon-Developing film requires accurate measurements. To do this you will need some graduated containers. At this price you might even consider getting two sets of these so you can have some extra containers.

Chemical Stirring Paddle-($3.49) from Adorama

Norpro 243 3-Piece Plastic Funnel Set-($5.00) from Amazon

Plastic Transfer Pipettes 3ml, Gradulated, Pack of 100-($5.99) from Amazon-these will help you measure small quantities of liquid, like the Kodak Photo Flo listed below.

Chemical Storage Containers-($3.49 to $5.95 each) from Adorama

Chemicals

Developer-The developer is key to the whole process. There are many different developers, each with their own unique qualities, that people use. Once you get more experienced (and adventurous) you can experiment but for now you probably want one that is flexible and easy to use. I started out with Ilford Ilfosol-3-($8.50) from Adorama-it’s a liquid developer that makes 1-2 gallons depending on dilution. After I ran out of that I bought some Kodak HC-110 but sadly it is not being made anymore so my next developer will probably be some  Kodak D-76-($5.79) from Adorama-D-76 is a powdered developer that makes up to 1 gallon and gets lots of rave reviews for its simplicity and effectiveness.

Ilford Ilfostop-($6.50/500ml bottle)-Once you are done with the developer you need to stop the process so you don’t over develop. That’s where the “Stop Bath” comes in. Some people just rinse the film in water but I prefer to use an actual chemical. Just about any stop will work.

Ilford Rapid Fix-($6.95/500ml bottle)

Kodak Photo Flo-A drop or two of this in the final rinse will help water sheet off of the film as its drying.-($8.00) at Adorama

Hanger w/Binder Clips (take an extra hanger from your closet and a couple of large binder clips from your desk-FREE)

Scissors to carefully cut the negatives-(hopefully you have a pair of these-FREE)

Negative archive sheets-(various sizes & prices) on Amazon

What’s The Total Cost

After you get everything, the total cost for a couple rolls of film, the equipment and assorted chemicals should be around $150-$175, depending on where you get the equipment. That will be enough to get you through about 10-15 rolls of 35mm black and white film. After that you will need to re-stock the chemicals. The tank, beakers, changing bag, etc. will last a very long time. Near as I can quickly calculate, my approximate cost per roll of film to develop (including the roll of film) is about $6-$7, depending on the film. That works out to about 20-30 cents/frame, which isn’t too bad considering the fun you’ll have :-)

Stay tuned for part two which will cover the actual step-by-step process I use along with some tips and suggestions I have discovered along the way.

Happy Shooting!

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I'd love to hear from you. Please let me know of any comments, suggestions or ideas that you have.
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What’s Your Photo Backup Plan-Podcast Episode 8

A few weeks ago my photo backup plan was put to the test. For the first time in over 20 years of regular computer use I had a hard drive failure. The drive that bit the dust was my external hard drive that I stored a backup of most of my photographs along with my music files. Fortunately I had a backup of all the files that were on the doomed drive.

I Got Lucky

Even though I didn’t lose any files, I was extremely fortunate in that the drive that failed was one that had every single file backed up to the “cloud” courtesy of CrashPlan, which I’ve used for the last couple of years for cloud backup. Where I got lucky was that CrashPlan was my only backup of those files. If CrashPlan had somehow not worked properly I would have been very upset at a minimum and completely depressed and suicidal at the extreme. Needless to say I don’t want to tread that thin line of near-disaster in the future. That means that I needed to update my photo (and other valuable data) backup strategy.

What The Experts Say About Photo Backup Strategies

The experts at the American Society of Media Photographers suggest that professional photographers adopt a “3-2-1” backup strategy. They define the core goals of their robust, and redundant, strategy this way:

  1. Keeping at least three copies of any important file (a primary and two backups). That means that for every photograph that is stored on your primary [working] drive you should be keeping at least two additional copies on some other type of backup device.
  2. Storing these backup copies on at least two different media types to protect against different types of hazards.
  3. One copy of each file should be stored offsite and stored offline.

Well, I’m not a professional photographer but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night :-) Pro photographer or not, it was easy to see that my old “strategy” needed to be upgraded. I’ve done parts of their recommended strategy off and on but never on a consistent basis. And consistency is the key because you never know when something bad will happen to your data. It was time to make some changes.

 What My New And Improved Plan Is

Based on my brush with “data death” I am now doing things differently than before. I have followed the recommendations of the “3-2-1″ strategy and have equipped myself to be able to follow through on that strategy. Here’s what I have changed:

  1. I purchased an external hard drive docking station and two hard drives (2TB each) so that I can backup to one external drive each day and once each week (Sunday) to the other.
  2. I will make a backup to the second external drive once each week and then take it to work with me. I will then rotate the drives each week. This way I will always have have one onsite backup, one cloud-based backup, and one offsite backup that will be no older than 1 week.
  3. I have setup scheduled backups using SyncBack Free, which I have used off and on for the last couple of years. I’m also trying out Comodo Backup just to see what the differences are. Both are very good (and free) options.
  4. I use CrashPlan to backup my files to the cloud on a continuous basis.
  5. I have invested in a copy of SpinRite which helps keep hard drives running well and can recover data from misbehaving drives.

Here’s what I purchased:

Total one time cost for equipment and software $298.00 The monthly cost of CrashPlan is $5.00 ($60.00/year).

The feeling of security and comfort I get from knowing that my valuable photos, music and other data is backed up……Priceless!

Why Not NAS

Some of you may be wondering why I didn’t get a Drobo or some other type of multi-disk box. Well, before buying my new 2TB drives I investigated setting up a NAS (network attached storage). While a NAS would be sweet, I don’t really need one, at least at this point. The reasons for this are:

  • My total image/music/user files adds up to just under 1TB, which can be easily handled with the 2TB drives.
  • I don’t do a lot of streaming to other computers. Music is the only thing I stream and the total size of my FLAC music files is 150gb so I just have it on a 1TB internal drive.
  • A quality NAS-box can get expensive by the time you add enough drives to adequately cover your data safety needs. At this point I can better spend my money on new camera equipment. I’m sure that I will get a NAS within the next couple of years once my image/music collection grows and at that point I’d probably get one of the Synology units (most likely a 4-drive setup).

Hopefully my experience with near data disaster and resulting re-commitment to data and photo backup has got you to re-evaluate your own data backup strategy. As photographers, we take so much time and effort in capturing and presenting our images, shouldn’t we also take some time and care in doing what we can to preserve those precious images?

Happy Shooting (and backing up)!

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I'd love to hear from you. Please let me know of any comments, suggestions or ideas that you have.
  • Use the comments feature on this page
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  • Email me at feedback [at] marksphotographyspot [dot] com
  • If you like, you can send me a real live paper letter :-) at: Mark Sinderson, P.O. Box 922594, Norcross, GA 30010

Please Connect With Me

In addition to contacting me from this blog using the links above. Or you can follow me on these other social media sites: Follow me on Google+ Follow the Mark's Photography Spot page on Google+ Check out the Mark's Photography Spot group on Flickr

 

Photo Sharing Site Tips And Cautions-Episode 7

These days, using a photo sharing site to get your images out to the world is something that just about every photographer does. There are many photo sharing site options but which ones are worth your time and effort? And, once you decide to use a photo sharing site, what issues do you need to be aware of? I hope to help you answer these questions and give you some resources you can use to get the most out of your photo sharing sites.

First, let’s discuss the “top 5″ photo sharing sites that I use to get my photography out to the world. After that I want to introduce a new feature that will allow podcast listeners (and anyone else who reads this) to participate in a photo sharing opportunity.

Google Plus

 Google Plus has quickly become a favorite photo sharing site for photographers interested in connecting with other like-minded individuals. Since its start in 2011 it has quickly grown to become one of the major places where creative types gather to share their work. If you are interested in seeing other photographers work and connecting with like-minded individuals, Google + is a must!

Flickr

 Flickr is one of the big dogs in the photo sharing site world. It has gone through some rough periods over the last year or so due to some less than well received interface updates. Despite that, I (and millions of other photographers) use Flickr as one of my top two photo sharing sites. You can use Flickr with a free account or get a paid account (for around $40) that gives you add-free browsing and some other benefits like statistics, etc. If you want, you can join the Mark’s Photography Spot group and submit your images. I hold a “Photo Share & Discussion on Saturdays at 6PM Eastern where we review images posted to the group. You can get notified of upcoming shows by following Mark’s Photography Spot page on Google +.

500px

If you are really into photography 500px is a photo sharing site you need to visit. The site is really focused on displaying quality photographs. I have been posting images there for a couple of years and only post my better images. You can join/post for free but for a small membership you can become a “plus” member and get some additional benefits. Even if you don’t join the site or post images you owe it to yourself to check out 500px because the quality of the images is very good.

Ipernity

Ipernity is a newer photo-sharing site and I became aware of it during one of the somewhat bungled Flickr interface updates. Here is my page on Ipernity. I really like the site but haven’t posted as many images there as I would like. I plan on correcting that here in 2014. Ipernity has a nice feel to it and they have done some nice upgrades in the short time I have been posting images. They offer a free membership that gives you 200mb of uploads/month and access to 200 images at a time. Their “Club” membership is $30/year and gives you the ability to upload more images as well as allow you to acces all your content. I’m currently using the free mode but will probably upgrade later this year.

Your Own Site

Last, but certainly not least, you can host/share images on your own site. It’s easy to setup your own blog/portolio site. All you need is a domain and a web host and you’re good to go. Many people go this route (including me) and use WordPress as the foundation for their site. Or, if you don’t want to build and maintain your own site you can use one of the many portfolio hosting sites, of which Zenfolio and Smugmug are two of the biggest. You can even combine the two, which is what I have done, by hosting your site/blog and adding something like Zenfolio for the portfolio aspect. There are so many options.

Photo Sharing Site Cautions

Sharing your images is a great way to see some benefits from your photography. But, whenever you share your images you need to be aware of a key point:

There’s always a way to “steal” your images:

No matter what any particular site says there is always the risk that your images can/will be “stolen”, usually by unauthorized downloads. That’s just a fact. So, if you are paranoid about someone improperly downloading or using your images, online photo sharing sites probably aren’t for you. If, however, you want to make some of your photographs available online you can reduce the impact of someone stealing your images

1. Only upload at the size you feel comfortable with. For me, I have decided to upload images that aren’t full-sized, high resolution images. Instead, I upload images that are usually no bigger than 1200 pixels on the longest side. This means that when someone downloads an image they may get something that looks ok as computer wallpaper but won’t look so good as a print. I also attach an “All Rights Reserved” copyright to my images just so people know that I’m not a fan of unauthorized use of my images.

 New Photo Sharing Opportunity

Now that I’ve encouraged you to share some of your images o the web I want to introduce a new opportunity for you to share your images. Beginning with this podcast (Episode 7) I will give you a special tag that you can add to images that you post to the Mark’s Photography Spot group. I can then use that tag to identify images you have uploaded and discuss them in an upcoming episode. For this 1st go-around I’m asking you to upload one of your better images to the group and attach the Flickr tag of “MPS007″. I will accept images with this tag that are uploaded until February 23rd (two weeks from the date of this post). I will then discus the images in the March 2nd episode (episode 10). Please feel free to share any family-friendly images with all of us.

I’m looking forward to seeing your images. Happy Shooting!

Share Your Comments Or Ideas

I'd love to hear from you. Please let me know of any comments, suggestions or ideas that you have.
  • Use the comments feature on this page
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Please Connect With Me

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What’s The Best Camera-The One You Have With You-Podcast Episode 6

The Best Camera-A Definition

Any time photographers get together there is almost always a discussion/debate on  ”what’s the best camera”. People will go back and forth, for days on end, discussing all the technical details that supposedly make one camera or lens better than another.

While this is great fun, I’m going to suggest that picking the best camera is very easy and involves no debate. The best camera is always:

THE CAMERA YOU HAVE WITH YOU

It that easy, no arguments. I say this for the simple reason that no matter the resolution or features of the latest and greatest camera, if you don’t have a camera with you and a great image opportunity presents itself, the camera is useless to you unless you have it with you.

Over the last couple of years, starting in 2012 with my Project 365, I got in the habit of having a camera (usually the Canon Powershot S95 or Canon PowerShot S100) with me almost all of the time. In addition to helping me complete the project 365 the “always available” camera helped me think more photographically and allowed me to capture some images that I might not have if I was obsessing about always having “The Best Camera”.

Here are 4 representative shots from my project 365. None of them will win any awards but they are unique slices of life that I wouldn’t have captured if I left my camera at home.

A Little Off Course

This 1st image is from very early in my project 365, day 6 or so, and shows a bewildered driver (on the left) watching the Police as they come up with a plan to extricate his car from the woods. I captured this while walking to the store during lunch:

A Little Off Course- The best camera is the one you have with you

The driver of this car went off the road…just a little

 

Street Sign Wisdom

Here’s an image that says a lot about the Metric System in the US. Once again this was taken while I was out on a walk at work. I had my S95 in my pocket, ready to use at a moments notice, when I saw this interesting/ironic sign combination:

Street Sign Wisdom

This street sign says a lot about the state of the Metric System in the US

 

Sunset Reflections

I got this image of the setting sun reflecting off of some office buildings in Atlanta as I was headed to a business dinner. Once again, nothing award winning but I like the colors and composition of it. Also, at the time I originally posted it, several people said it reminded them of a scene from The Walking Dead and asked if I saw any Zombies. I always love it when an image spurs a variety of different thoughts and recollections. That just shows how powerful an even basic image can be.

Sunset reflections

The setting sun casts some nice reflections on an office building

Mid Life Crisis

As many of you know, I love cars of all types and I try to get as many quality photos of them as I can. Well, one day as I was stopping by my local Costco to do some shopping I saw this beautiful, pristine Ferrari in the parking lot. Luckily I had my “best camera” with me at the time (the S95) and was able to get the car photographed before the owner showed up with multiple packs of toilet paper that they just purchased in Costco :-)

Midlife Crisis

I found this pristine Ferrari while shopping at my local Costco

Now that I’ve defined the term “best camera” and shown you some fun images I captured by having a camera with me I hope I’ve inspired you to start carrying a camera (any camera) with you on a daily basis. Remember, the best camera isn’t the newest or most expensive one, it’s the one you have with you when you want/need to capture an image.

Until next time….Happy Shooting!

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I'd love to hear from you. Please let me know of any comments, suggestions or ideas that you have.
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Composition-The Top Five Things I’ve Learned So Far-Podcast Episode 5

One of the biggest things I have found to impact the quality of my photographs is to improve the composition in the images I capture. If you look for suggestions or tips on how to improve the composition of your photographs you will find an almost unlimited amount of information.

I’ve spent some time over the past couple of years working on improving my photo composition skills and have had good success in improving the images I shoot. Here are five tips I have used to improve my photographic compositions. These are by no means the be all end all but I think that these basic suggestions can go a long way towards improving the quality of your images, as they have mine.

Give them a shot and see if these tips help improve the quality of your images

1. Search For The Shot

When you find something that catches your eye, take a while to explore the scene and find the main thing that is interesting to you. Try to condense the scene to one or two key elements and use those as the building blocks of the final image.

2. Balancing Elements

Once you have identified the particular elements in the shot that are worthy of your attention, spend some time balancing them out within the frame. You can use a couple of “rules” to help you in this

Rule of thirds-Think of this as a tic-tac-toe board placed over your image and try to align the main subject(s) within the points where the horizontal and vertical lines intersect.

The Golden Ratio is another method of aligning the elements of an image within the frame. It uses a mathematical formula to come up with the “ideal” positioning of image elements. This is along the same lines as the rule of thirds but slightly different in the placement of the key elements.

If you use Lightroom, you can place overlays of both of these on your images to see the effect that each would have.

3. Viewpoint

Instead of just shooting the image from the “typical” viewpoint of someone viewing a scene from eye-level, take your camera and explore different perspectives on the scene. Get low to the ground, high up above, or off the the left or right of the main subject. Often you will find that changing the viewpoint can make a dramatic difference in the impact your photograph has.

4. Framing

Before you press that shutter button take some time to check and double-check how the image is framed in your camera’s viewfinder. Is there something blocking a key element of the shot? Or perhaps you can use some of the natural surroundings to frame the image for more impact. How about vertical as opposed to horizontal? Heck, why not shoot the scene with your camera oriented halfway between the two? Changing the orientation of the framing can make a big difference in the final image.

5. Experiment

I saved the best tip for last…Experiment with your photographic compositions. One of the best things about photography is the ability to try new things. So, as you start to incorporate some of the tips into your photography, mix them up a little, and see what happens. When you find an appealing scene approach it a few different ways and test some variations of your preferred composition to see what the impact is.

Some Books To Consider

I have found a couple of books on composition that have been helpful to me. Check them out:

The Photographer’s Eye: Composition and Design for Better Digital Photos

Composition: From Snapshots to Great Shots

Looking for something else? Here’s a listing of “photo composition” books on Amazon:  Photo Composition Books on Amazon

Share Your Comments Or Ideas

I'd love to hear from you. Please let me know of any comments, suggestions or ideas that you have.
  • Use the comments feature on this page
  • Click the "Send Voicemail" tab on the right side of the page
  • Email me at feedback [at] marksphotographyspot [dot] com
  • If you like, you can send me a real live paper letter :-) at: Mark Sinderson, P.O. Box 922594, Norcross, GA 30010

Please Connect With Me

In addition to contacting me from this blog using the links above. Or you can follow me on these other social media sites: Follow me on Google+ Follow the Mark's Photography Spot page on Google+ Check out the Mark's Photography Spot group on Flickr

Staying Safe While Shooting-Podcast Episode 4

Think about safety before heading out on your next photography outing

Photography is a great hobby but if you don’t pay attention or prepare for your next shoot you could find yourself in a difficult situation. Safety is one of those things we take for granted, but shouldn’t. Here are some tips and ideas on how to stay safe while shooting. It all comes down to a basic set of words:

Prepare and Be Aware

Staying safe while enjoying photography comes down to this basic statement.  If you take some time to PREPARE you go out for your next shoot and pay attention (BE AWARE) to what’s going on around you while you are wandering around with your camera, you will be much better off than the typical enthusiastic photographer.

Prepare

Have A Plan

  1. Think about where you want to go, and why. Don’t just wander around, especially in unfamiliar areas. Take some time to plan out when and where you want to shoot.
  2. Research the location ahead of time. Get an idea of where you want to go.
  3. Google is your friend. Use the vast resources of Mother Google to see what other photographers have captured in the area you are looking at visiting.

Let People Know Your Plans

  1. Give a basic itinerary with dates, times, places, etc.
  2. Make sure your family/friends have your phone number
  3. Pre-arrange a “check-in” time
  4. Register with rangers/authorities if necessary

Channel Your Inner Boy Scout

  1. Know the weather
  2. Have the right clothing
  3. Make sure your vehicle is in good working order
  4. Have food/water if venturing into back-country
  5. Think about taking an emergency kit if you will be away from developed areas

Be Aware

Be Careful Of GPS

  1. GPS can be wrong-don’t follow it blindly. GPS is far from perfect and if you follow it blindly you could find yourself in trouble.
  2. Maps are still valid, especially in remote areas. A well made map is much more useful than the GPS app on your iPhone, especially in remote areas. You should know how to read a map and use a compass to navigate if you get spun around or out and out lost.

Pay Attention To Your Surroundings

  1.  Know where you are shooting.
  2. Keep an eye out for potential trouble. Whether you’re in the back country or center of the city, keep a watchful eye on what’s going on around you.
  3. Shoot in pairs. Sometimes it’s best to bring a friend with you. Even if your friend isn’t as obsessed with photography as you are, they could potentially save your butt.  I know that if it wasn’t for my wife Pam, I might have wandered off a cliff several times while fixated on what was in my viewfinder :-)

Be Able To Speak Even When You Can’t Speak

  1. Use the ICE feature on your cellphone
  2. Have some type of medical/emergency contact info with you. I’d recommend getting something like a Road ID  to let emergency responders know about you and any medical conditions you may have. I have had one for the last 6 years that I wear whenever I’m out away from home (hiking, biking, running, etc.). Thankfully, I haven’t needed to use it but it’s nice to know that if something were to happen to me, my family and doctor could be contacted.

Safety is one of those things we rarely think about until something bad happens. I hope these tips and suggestions will help you plan your next successful, and safe, photography outing. Remember, it takes a few extra minutes of planning to stay safe while shooting but doing so can help you avoid a lifetime of regret.

Stay safe and Happy Shooting!

Share Your Comments Or Ideas

I'd love to hear from you. Please let me know of any comments, suggestions or ideas that you have.
  • Use the comments feature on this page
  • Click the "Send Voicemail" tab on the right side of the page
  • Email me at feedback [at] marksphotographyspot [dot] com
  • If you like, you can send me a real live paper letter :-) at: Mark Sinderson, P.O. Box 922594, Norcross, GA 30010

Please Connect With Me

In addition to contacting me from this blog using the links above. Or you can follow me on these other social media sites: Follow me on Google+ Follow the Mark's Photography Spot page on Google+ Check out the Mark's Photography Spot group on Flickr